Poor Dental Health Consequences

While we know that not taking care of our oral health will be detrimental to our teeth, did you know that it could influence the health of your entire body? Poor dental health can have greater consequences on your overall health than you may realize. Take a look at some of the biggest problems that can arise from neglecting this part of your body.

 

Dental Health Steps

 
 

 
To ensure proper dental health, it is important that all things associated are in place. This includes:

 

  • Brushing your teeth at least twice a day, morning and night. This is the simplest and most effective way to rid your mouth of bacteria and plaque before it has the chance to do damage.
  • Flossing is just as important as brushing for your health, but an alarming number of people don’t floss on a regular basis. It is estimated that only half of Americans will floss their teeth daily. This is essential for getting rid of any leftover particles between the teeth.
  • Scheduling a dental appointment for every six months can help detect problems before they become serious. More than a third of the American population did not have a dental appointment in the last year.
  • Eat the right foods that will promote healthy teeth and gums rather than causing more advanced problems.

 

These four steps together will be key in preventing the following health problems.

 

Health Consequences

 
 

 
These health consequences will make themselves known the longer you neglect the most basics of oral hygiene:

 

  • Halitosis – bad breath is often a complaint from many that can be taken care of with proper oral hygiene. Often when food gets stuck between our teeth and as they collect bacteria they begin to smell. Flossing and brushing together can remove these particles, reducing this occurrence.
  • Atherosclerosis – when there are high levels of bacteria that can cause disease in your mouth, it can cause the clogging of the Carotid Artery. This can lead to serious problems, including the risk of stroke.
  • Heart Disease – people who have periodontal disease (a bone deterioration around the teeth) have a higher risk of developing heart disease. The periodontal bacteria and plaque will enter the bloodstream from the gum, causing the arteries to narrow. In addition to this, cholesterol levels can rise in the face of gum disease and cavities.
  • Diabetes – Almost all adults, about 95%, who have diabetes also have periodontal disease. This can be the first indicator for this dangerous condition.


These are just a few of the health consequences that come when your teeth are not properly cared for. Make the changes in your dental hygiene to prevent more serious problems down the road.